The Design

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The Trailer

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The Floor

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The Walls

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The Roof

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Skylights

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Electrical

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Weatherproofing

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Siding

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Design & Development

Designing the tiny house involved planning the space, the structure, and looking for innovative ways to use the least energy (such as the south facing windows). Learn more.

Reconstructing the trailer structure

Creating the chasis involved taking a rusted boat trailer, rebuilding the axles, and adding rienforcing steel to strengthen the structure. Learn more.

Constructing the floor

The floor was built with lumber taken from disassembled pallets. The 'V' on the trailer that once accomodated a boat was filled with insulation to make the space warmer. Learn more.

Constructing the walls

As with the floor, most of the walls were built from old pallets. I was able to find some pallets made from 4x4 lumber which was used on the south wall between the windows. Learn more.

Building the roof

The roof was a steep gable to accomodate the bed loft. I used a torch-down roofing because the trailer had to be able to survive road travel. Learn more.

Installing skylights

The skylights were found at low cost and added a great deal of value to the bed loft. Sealing skylights is a complicated process which I describe in detail. Learn more.

Wiring the tiny house

The house was wired using standard parts except for the shallow outlets that allowed for more insulation. The underside of the house had two female inputs for standard 30 amp service. Learn more.

Weatherproofing

A great deal of attention was put into weatherproofing to ensure that no cold air seeped in during the chilly winters. Learn more.

Siding

As much as possible of the siding was from found materials. Some wood had to be bought in order to cover large surfaces without blemishes. Learn more.